CANCER MEDICINE – Fall Harvest 1994 Chapter 2

© Pat Irwin Lycett (wk.pi.lycett@sympatico.ca)

(There is a PDF of this entry which has supporting footnotes not available in a blog. If you would like a copy of the PDF version, click here: CANCER MEDICINE – Fall Harvest 1994 Chapter 2

I love watching the delicate tiny flakes land on branches and boughs. It’s solstice time again, the close of a year of emotional flip-flops, begun last winter with the indignity of the first lump. My story summarizes the brilliant concepts of many forward-thinking healers. I have a new take on life – new tools for health, and a re-newed appreciation of family and friends.

My regular doctors are unfamiliar with environmental and orthomolecular medicine.
I might offer to lend them my marked-up texts, now bound with elastic bands. Continue reading

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CANCER MEDICINE – Fall Harvest. 1994- Chapter 1

© Pat Irwin Lycett (wk.pi.lycett@sympatico.ca)

(There is a PDF of this entry which has supporting footnotes not available in a blog. If you would like a copy of the PDF version, click here: CANCER MEDICINE – Fall Harvest. 1994- Chapter 1

I now have two prostheses in place. October is breast cancer month, and I’m interviewed by a friend for our weekly Orono Times. In the article I mention self-examination, but stress nutrition, detox, family closeness, friends and the spiritual learning that has accompanied this severe illness. People stop on the street to thank me for sharing.

James Redfield in The Celestine Prophecy comments that “An accelerated perception of beauty is linked to spiritual unfolding.” People, ideas, plants, animals, even rocks, grow more beautiful every day, each with an energy that I tap into for better health. All my relationships are going through transition, revving up the emotional and spiritual aspects of my recovery.

In November, Kellie and I drive to Dr. Rogers in Syracuse. We check into the hotel and I head off for my first appointment. We’ve now communicated for seven months and I can
hardly wait to meet her. Continue reading

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CANCER MEDICINE – Summer Haze 1994 Chapter 2

© Pat Irwin Lycett (wk.pi.lycett@sympatico.ca)

(There is a PDF of this entry which has supporting footnotes not available in a blog. If you would like a copy of the PDF version, click here: CANCER MEDICINE – Summer Haze 1994 Chapter 2

I’m soaking in a huge hot tub outdoors in early September among a dozen nude strangers, both women and men. “Do you mind that I have all these scars,” I ask, “that I’ve lost so many body parts?”

“Nah, it’ll be educational,” someone says. Then the alarm wakes me at 2AM. I apologize to my dear husband, who vows that he has no trouble getting back to sleep. I choke down eight New Zealand pancreatic digestive enzymes, from organically raised pigs. In regular digestion enzymes act upon food substances, reducing them to simpler compounds. In cancer treatment, two nightly doses (2 and 6 AM), taken when nothing competes for their use (no food being digested), penetrate tissues and break down cancer cells. Enzyme therapy, along with organic foods, is now critical to my remaining cancer-free. We get rid of our microwave. Continue reading

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CANCER MEDICINE – Summer Haze 1994 Chapter1

© Pat Irwin Lycett (wk.pi.lycett@sympatico.ca)

(There is a PDF of this entry which has supporting footnotes not available in a blog. If you would like a copy of the PDF version, click here:CANCER MEDICINE – Summer Haze 1994 Chapter 1

“I’m not going to die, I will see them grow up!” my smiling eyes say to the camera as I hold cousins Jake and Keara, now five months old. It’s the end of August, and we’re celebrating Emma’s second birthday, her uncle Matt’s too. My doctor said to lie down, avoid jolting, and we could make the drive. I’m wearing a green summer top with both plastic boobs in place, and a loose fitting skirt, as my abdomen is very sore. My sons are all watching me; I smile straight into the lens – spirited and determined – I will see these babies grow up.

But, back to July 13th, the day of my second mastectomy. My buddies are in the waiting room, sending reiki healing. Post-op there is very little pain, but a nerve was severed on lymph-node excision – easily done, the nerve a tiny hair-like thing – closing sweat glands, a major escape route for waste. I’ve spent months learning the lethal connection between disease and the body’s inability to dump waste, and now have an even greater need to explore all means of detoxification.

The following day, a routine ultrasound shows a ‘shadow’ in my left ovary. I’m not too concerned; a trusted massage therapist, months before, discovered a cyst in that area. But Pac-Woman Transformer 3, protecting our interests, slides into place.
My doctors, fearful of deadly ovarian cancer, promote a total hysterectomy, and send me home to recover from the mastectomy. I call Dr. Rogers to book an appointment in Syracuse – need to get to the heart of the matter. I’m learning as fast as I can, and I know almost enough to re-train my body to wellness: organic foods, meditation, gratitude for all the good things in my life including the calm, ever-present support of my dear husband, Kay. I can almost see my way clear to avoiding surgery and I’m reasonably sure that the shadow is just a cyst. But then, I’ve come to view cysts as lymph tissue harboring built-up of waste; I’m scared and demoralized, can’t take a chance, so I go for the whole ball o’ wax ¬– and we schedule early August. Continue reading

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CANCER MEDICINE – Spring light 1994, Chapter 4

(There is a PDF of this entry which has supporting footnotes not available in a blog. If you would like a copy of the PDF version, click here: Pat Irwin Lycett CANCER MEDICINE Spring Light 1994 Chapter 4 ).
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In late May we plant pine trees for the new babies, Jake and Keara, in an area set aside for grandkids. I try to get extra rest, aware that Crohn’s and cancer are messages from my subconscious to cut the chaos, stop killing myself, a common predicament for women like me: Completing a degree in Psychology, E.R. nursing, opening an antique shop, limping through a devastating marriage break-up, worry about our sons, buying a Re/Max franchise, ongoing volunteer activities, the excitement of my new marriage and stepkids, my mother’s declining years, winding down my real estate career, opening a book store, run, run, run. I’ve never really thought of myself as a sick person as nothing slows me down for long. I’m doing so many healthy things, and I thank my body, daily, for its powers of recovery.

In early June, we watch the Joy Luck Club, a story of Chinese mothers and daughters. I’m haunted by the thought that I did not do enough for my mother in the closing weeks of 1989. My second major Crohn’s attack had leveled me, and I felt that I might be dying myself. We brought her home from the hospital and she died within weeks, just before Christmas. We were always close, but I took her enormously for granted, along with the other good things in my life. She was a strong, peaceful beacon for my sister and me, and for everyone lucky enough to know her; a kind and loving woman who lived with me in both my marriages, helped to raise our sons at critical times, and her grandsons adored her. I miss her still.

Since my cancer experience, I am even more committed to presenting alternative health-care speakers at the store. Barbara Walker, a member of our book club, introduces us to Therapeutic Touch. Continue reading

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CANCER MEDICINE – Spring Light 1994 Chapter 3

(There is a PDF of this entry which has supporting footnotes not available in a blog. If you would like a copy of the PDF version, click here: Pat Irwin Lycett CANCER MEDICINE Spring Light 1994 Chapter 3

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I’m learning as fast as I can. Options, the Alternative Cancer Therapy Book has become my new bible. “There is no cancer in normal metabolism,” according to Dr. Max Gerson, who died in 1959, the year I finished nursing training. He advises low-fat food to flood the body with nutrients, coupled with a detoxification program – good stuff in, garbage out – a totally new slant on the development and treatment of cancer; apparently unknown to our North American medical community.

With sudden comprehension, a possible link unfolds between my parents’ malnourished, depression-era life (eight years will pass before I learn that I had boils on my body when I was born), and my recurrent childhood illnesses: tooth decay, broken bones, rheumatic fever, abdominal pain, colitis, and cancer. Genetic makeup (father’s ‘tricky stomach’), burning the candle at both ends, aloneness, and a few misguided medical practices have finally brought me down. Continue reading

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Cancer Medicine – Spring Light 1994 Chapter 2

(There is a PDF of this entry which has supporting footnotes not available in a blog. If you would like a copy of the PDF version, click here: Pat Irwin Lycett CANCER MEDICINE Light 02 )

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I’m so excited. It’s mid-April, seven weeks post-op, and I book an appointment with The Mastectomy Shop in Oshawa. Can hardly wait to get my shape back.

I’ve had so many breast dreams lately – day-time reveries and the fast-asleep kind – and last night brought two doozies.

In the first I’m an Amazon on horseback shooting kidnappers attacking our tribe. I bolt awake, wanting to hug this real me who came to rev-up my flagging courage. The second dream is of an actual event in my RN training. A local shop picked me as the maid of honour for our in-house bridal show. My lovely classmate chosen as the bride was, they said, more demure.

On the scheduled date I jump into my car and race to meet the smiling owner. I learn of her dedication, following the death of her mother, to fighting the loneliness of cancer. In the dressing room she displays bras in white, ecru and black and a soft, plastic, skin-toned, expensive artificial breast . It’s truly a marvel, even has a nipple. I’d no idea what it would look like, what it would feel like, that it would form so perfectly to my body; that it seems, immediately, a real part of me. I don my sweater and smile at my reflection; I have my balance back! I roll up my friend’s life-saving padded satin slip and store it in my purse. I hug my new friend, retrieve my car and drive home smiling from ear to ear.

Sometimes, when I see a woman with decent-looking breasts, I’m so jealous I
could scream and tear my hair at the unfairness of it all. But I still have one, and with this soft, breast-like appendage in my bra, I at least have my visible-for-all-to-see body back!

“What do you think, Kay?” I ask, bouncing into his office. Continue reading

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